We’re stuck in an age of business where being preoccupied fools us into thinking we’re progressing. For Mesa Community College students, this leads to a cluttered life squeezing work, friends, school, internships, and activities into the small hours of a day.

This chaos leaves people exhausted in a burn out culture. The best way to complete your goals is to simplify, focus, and organize. Instead of over complicating our lives, we need to adapt to the ‘less is more’ strategy or the, ‘quality over quantity’ motto.

Keeping busy does not mean you are being productive. When you feel overwhelmed, it is a good time to ask yourself what’s necessary and what’s just busy work. The difference is that necessities will actually get you toward your goal while the busy work just keeps you working. Busy work could also be chores and small tasks. You feel like you are working but in reality, you’re doing small stuff that keeps you out of the big picture.

Determining your distractions is the next step. These are time wasters such as streaming or prowling social media. Hours are wasted in these activities and before you know it, your whole week has flown by.  It’s easy to do, and we all do it, but reduction is key.

Prioritizing what needs to be cut out of your life is difficult, but important. Once goals and distractions are recognized, time management can be arranged. You’ve decided what you need and what you don’t need and once that’s recognized, you can act on it. It won’t be easy to suddenly cut off distractions so, starting off slow is ideal. Someone who spends five hours a day on social media can cut down to four, then three, weening off a bit more each day until it doesn’t invade their lives.

Quantity over quality is a vital motto for students to remember when college gets chaotic. You reap what you sow, so it’s time to think about what you’re planting while you’re young.

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Allison Cripe

Allison Cripe

Social Media Editor at Mesa Legend
Social Media Editor for the Mesa Legend and contributing writer.
Allison Cripe